Alphabet Soup: News Agencies Are Supposed to Suspect Intelligence Agencies Not Shill For Them

Alphabet Soup

Somebody needs to tell these ex-CIA (and current…. nobody leaves the agency) yahoos on all the cable news channels that the President is the “boss” of the Executive Branch, which is the branch of government that the CIA is a part of. The Legislative Branch created them too in case they have forgotten, and has, as the people’s representatives, a role in their oversight. What is President Trump supposed to do now? Trust the DOJ? Trust FBI? Trust CIA? What evidence can they now provide that proves they can be impartial?

Ex-CIA Phillip Mudd Warning Trump on CNN

John Brennan Says Nunes Abused His Office

Over the last year or so we’ve learned that Loretta Lynch met with a presidential candidate’s husband on a tarmac to talk about his “grand kids.” That the FBI interviewed Mrs. Clinton without putting her under oath while her subordinates were practically in the the next room smashing devices with hammers. That her team had her hard drives acid washed the day after their contents were subpoenaed   Across the hall a perjury trap was being set for Trump’s man Michael Flynn, while other agents were busy rifling through Paul Manafort’s financials from more than two years previous. The FBI wrote Clinton’s exoneration letter before the investigation was anything near complete. Over at the DOJ Bruce Ohr was shoveling his CIA operative wife’s (Nellie Ohr) research through Fusion GPS into the hands of the FBI. Who then used it to get a FISA Warrant. While getting the warrant the FBI quoted from a Yahoo News story that was written based on the very Dossier they were using to get the warrant. That’s right, confirming the Steele Dossier’s contents with an article written based on the dossier itself. A Dossier that turned out to be pure trash that was paid for by the DNC that Hillary Clinton, according to Donna Brazil, was running at the time. If rank and file agents in the CIA and FBI are pissed, let them be pissed at the politicization of their beloved agencies by their leaders, as they OBVIOUSLY were pulling for Team Clinton over Team Trump and let their bias and political friendships get in the way of doing their jobs.

The CIA, which is not suppose to be operating domestically without an attaché (the FBI provides this service sometimes) is not a branch-less unaccountable group of black operators. They have a mission and should get back to it or get fired. It is scary and UNHEARD OF BY THE WAY, in our Republic to have the CIA in front of the cameras engaging in political influence peddling. This is a psychological operation being run on the American people being allowed by the blind hatred of the so-called Fourth Estate. Things are really out of control if secretive agencies feel free to walk around in the daylight to blather on nightly news shows. Journalists are supposed to be suspicious and objective, but these “news entertainers” are eating out of the hands of the intelligence services. Hands that write narratives, deceive, and kill for a living. 

Just to butter this bread a little more, Rob Reiner, Meathead, and hippy from the 60’s and 70’s came out today with a tweet that I’ll quote in full below. Folks it is unbelievable what these people say. You just can’t make this stuff up. Real life is truly stranger than fiction.

“When you libel James Clapper and John Brennan you libel America. The desperate attack on men who have given over 90 years of dedicated service to our country is clear evidence of a conscientiousness of guilt.” – Rob Reiner

Reiner, who was once rabidly opposed to the CIA run Vietnam War, now wraps himself and the CIA in the American flag, and tells us they are untouchable moral angels. But we know better. Remember that Brennan worked for the agency when they were selling crack on American streets. When they destroyed poor Gary Webb, the journalist who uncovered their untoward deeds and wrote about them, to the point that he was so ruined that he took his own life. The recent Tom Cruise film, “American Made” is about CIA drug running and is based on a pilot’s real life account of his activity with the agency.

So come now Mr. Reiner, Mr. Mudd, Mr. Brennan, and Mr. Clapper, stop trying to sell the idea of innocence to us. It is rotten, and no one is buying it. Or haven’t you noticed that the channel you love to talk on the most has the worst ratings. If no one believes you look no further than a mirror to find the reason why. I mean, Mr. Clapper in March of 2013 was asked point-blank while under oath testifying before congress whether his agency was “collecting any type of data at all?” He said, “No sir.” But of course Edward Snowden proved that was a lie. So let’s get back to party-less intelligence work shall we, and out of our governing processes. We like it better when it is as it should be… when we don’t know that you are there.

 

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Crock Pot In The Coal Mine

Crock Pot In The Coal Mine

My wife watches the show “This Is Us.” I usually lay there and watch Youtube videos, but for some reason, this week, I watched along with her. At the end of the most recent show *SPOILER ALERT* Jack Pearson places a kitchen towel against an old Crock Pot with an electrical short and inadvertently starts a house fire. This solves, at least in part, the mystery of how Jack dies. Every fan of the show, which is overwhelmingly female in demographic, has been waiting to find out how the fire that took Jack’s life got started. As the Pearson home was engulfed in flames on my screen I leaned over to my wife and jokingly said, “Welp Crock Pot stock will drop tomorrow.” She wasn’t amused. I, however, should have traded stock on my hunch. The next day crock pots all across the country went into the trash can. NBC and Newell (the company that manufactures Crock Pots) had to issue statements about their safety. Newell’s stock went into a tail spin. It is irrational. It is overly cautious. It is a pure fear-based emotional response. It is also a canary in our coal mine.

Miners, for those that don’t know, often died of silent noxious gas exposure. So they took canaries with them as they delved ever more deeply. The smaller biology of the canary caused it to succumbed much sooner to the gas. If the canaries died, it served as a warning to the miners that their own death was imminent. Crock pots being thrown into trash cans leading to a company being nearly destroyed because of a television character’s death is a canary in our collective coal mine. It is a clear demonstration of the underlying effect of being over-informed, and over-entertained. Subtly and slowly, we have become a culture that lives on fear based emotions. The once proud and courageous men and women who loaded up covered wagons, crossed the Mississippi river, and went to settle the western lands among Apaches are no more. What happened to our strength of constitution? Our fortitude? Our rugged love of risk taking? What happened to the American spirit? They appear to be in the trash can under our Crock Pots. We’d all still be huddled around kitchen fires in Boston if our generation was expected to settle the West. Except, there’d be no fires in the kitchen anymore because those are dangerous.

We need to stop living in fear. We need to stop allowing our government and the entertainment complex to control us through fear. We need to break our addiction to fear-porn. All day long every day all we hear is that the sky is falling, literally. Global warming is going to kill us all. We need the Environmental Protection Agency. Terrorists are coming to behead us all. We need to send government troops to dominate the rest of the world so we can “feel” safe at home. Sexual predators are everywhere just waiting to sexually assault us. We need Hollywood and the music industry (two notoriously corrupt industries that objectify women for money all day every day) to tell us how to live healthy sex lives. Guns are dangerous and randomly kill people. We need lots of S.W.A.T teams and the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms. Children should be leashed like animals and never get out of our sight. We need the Consumer Protection Agency. Ecoli is in our greens and Salmonella in our meats. We need the Food and Drug Administration.  Illegal immigrants are taking our jobs, so we need a protective wall and protective tariffs. Racism is on the rise so we need hate crimes legislation. Supposedly, according to the best and brightest on college campuses across our land, the U.S. is full of white, patriarchal, misogynist, racist, homophobes trying to impose their mathematics, high school education, monogamous marriage, and child-rearing culture on everyone else. This above all else should be feared. They are so afraid of these boogeymen that they must retreat to safe spaces with coloring books and hot cocoa to soothe their tender feelings.

You can now cease to wonder how these young people turned out to be such emotionally weak crybabies. We did it to them. We wrapped them in bubble wrap and sent them out to play in a 10 square foot space, in our postage stamp-sized, fenced-in back yards. We hovered over them. We threw our crock pots away. We abandoned bravery and calculated risk. We became addicted to fearporn. We are all like college football coaches in the fourth quarter playing not to lose. As any football fan will tell you, playing it safe in a football game will get an “loss” hung on your team (ask the University of Georgia). It will also get a loss hung around your neck in life too. When enough of us get that dreaded L, then the nation gets one too. And that my friends, is how civilizations fall.

So ladies, primarily I am speaking to you here, defy the government and its crony media complexes. Show your sons and daughters that you are not afraid. Go and dig those Crock Pots out of the trash can, and, in as non a misogynistic way as I can say this, “go make a pot roast or something.” Send the kids out to play and don’t watch every move they make. When they come in crying from a skinned knee, tell them to suck it up, slap a band aid on it, and tell them it is a battle scar. Tell them you don’t want to see them again until the street lights come on. Tell them to go build a ramp for their bikes out of plywood and brick-o-blocks. Tell your schools to let them play dodge ball… on the monkey bars. Refuse to take a participation trophy home. Throw that in the trash if you must throw something away. Or, if you are itching to throw something away, how about their Xbox or their handheld device? We’ve got to cross a new Mississippi river, a cultural one. If you keep throwing away Crock Pots because an imaginary character on a television show died, we’re not going to make it across. We need men to step up and be men again and take off those stupid looking skinny jeans and face the world as it really is, a cold and rugged place. We need men and women to understand that they need each other again. We need our young ladies to be at least as fearless, if not more, than our young men. And if you think this is all just toxic masculinity, let me suggest that perhaps you are engaged in a toxic form of femininity. You’ve turned our children into weak-hearted and emotionally stunted victims. The noxious gas is rising. The canaries are all dead.

Helicopter Colonialism and Trump’s Valid Question

Weekend Reading

helicopter

In a recent meeting between the President and a bipartisan group of lawmakers trying to broker a new immigration policy “deal”, President Trump, in a response to part of that committee wanting to reserve open immigration status for Haiti, El Salvador, and African countries, said something to this effect, “Why do people from #$%!hole countries want to come here?” This has ignited a firestorm in the mainstream press, and among keyboard warriors on social media that firmly believe in the narrative that the author of “The Art of the Deal” is essentially a xenophobic, racist, white supremacist.

Now, I firmly disagree with his choice of language. I do not use such language myself. I especially do not use such language to refer to people and cultures. For sure, The Donald is no statesman, and I wish we had a person in the Whitehouse with stronger moral fiber, or at least a deactivated Twitter account. But his question, if we change the language, is a valid one. Let’s ask the question that he asked in another way.

Bipartisan Lawmakers: We want to reserve the status of Haitians, El Salvadorans, and multiple African nations to come here easily as part of the new immigration deal.

The Donald: Why do people from ”under developed” countries come here?

The point he is making by asking such a question is that if we continue with our loose immigration policy as it is, then those underdeveloped countries will continue to lose many of their citizens to us, leaving them perennially underdeveloped, and also perennially in need of our assistance. The phrasing of the question was bad, but the question itself is valid. We have to stop yelling racism at everything. If you think somewhere would not be a good place to live, it does not necessarily follow that race is the reason. Perhaps his comment was aimed at the murder rate per 100,000 persons in those countries.

Haiti has a murder rate of 10 persons per 100,000 persons. That is nearly double the international average, and it has doubled internally since 2008, when it was 5 persons per 100,000 persons.

El Salvador has the #4 highest murder rate in the entire world at 41.2 persons per 100,000 persons. African Countries make up a considerable number of the top 25 worst countries as far as the murder rate per 100,000 persons is concerned. Botswana is #24 in the world with a murder rate of 18.4 persons per 100,000 persons. Nigeria is #20 in the world with a murder rate of 20 persons per 100,000 persons. Rwanda is #17 in the world with a murder rate of 23.1 persons per 100,000 persons. The Democratic Republic of Congo is #14 in the world with a murder rate of 28.3 persons per 100,000 persons. South Africa is #10 in the world with a murder rate of 31 persons per 100,000 persons. Swaziland is #8 in the world with a murder rate of 33.8 persons per 100,000 persons.

Clearly these are places that people would not choose to immigrate to if given the choice. I’d venture to say that most people that read this piece, outside of missionaries and aid workers, would never even willingly choose to travel in these countries. Why? Because they are xenophobic racists, or because they are sensible? The average murder rate in the world is around 5 persons per 100,000 persons. All these nations are significantly more dangerous, some of them many times more dangerous than the rest of the world. They can accurately be described as terrible countries to live in.

Of course, this ignites feelings of compassion, and it should. We are a very compassionate people. Americans do a lot of good in the world. But there are real questions surrounding our immigration policy and its impacts. “Are we really helping those countries in the long term?” Also, “Are we enabling their immediate national neighbors to avoid their responsibility in the region?” And finally, “How does this effect our own nation? What are the challenges that we will face domestically due to our policies?” Immigration is good, and a necessary part of U.S. economic policy. But, we are under no obligation to be the destination spot for immigrants from those countries. And our immigration polices maybe hurting not only Caribbean, South and Central American, and African countries individually, but possibly entire regions and continents over the long haul. Sustainability is a word often thrown around in environmental contexts, but what about immigration policy? Is our current policy financially sustainable?

It is unfortunate that it takes human beings enduring difficulty to form them into better persons, but such is the truth. Suffering goes on for much longer than we want it to or think that we can bear. This can be said of people groups too. In order for a nation to grow and reach its potential they often must endure difficulty. In ancient Greece there was the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta. In Europe there was the Black plague, The Hundred Years War, and countless other difficulties including serfdom, dictatorships, ethnic wars, and famine. Our history in the U.S. directly precedes the English Civil War and the English Bill of Rights, which greatly informed the founding generations view of how to keep civil peace through religious toleration. The short march to our own Revolutionary was caused by taxes put on us by the British to refill their coffers after they emptied them in the bloody frontier war we call the French and Indian War. A war where women and children were as apt to be victims as men.  We learned our lessons in hardship. And while, yes, it is easy for me to sit behind my keyboard and suggest that immigrants in difficult places in the world might need to stay and make things better for their nations in the face of escalating murder rates. Nevertheless, it might just be the truth. I am the beneficiary of sacrifice and civilizational building through the dreaming and suffering of my ancestors. Nations are not built in any other way. I wish there was a Staples type easy button. The fact is, there isn’t.

Take a look at our pie in the sky view of democracy. We leveled the country of Iraq, wrote a constitution for them, and erected voting booths. George W. Bush naively stood on the deck of an aircraft carrier and announced “mission accomplished.” Was it? No, because democratic institutions are, like Rome, “not built in a day.” Democratic Republics are forged in the fires of history, not whipped up like so much instant pudding. You can’t add milk and stir. Our civilization goes back thousands of years to the Greeks themselves. Early American documents quote their works more than any other source outside of the Bible. We came to societal order, republics, rights, and self-governance through millennia of trouble and failure.

We often confuse love with feelings. I am afraid our immigration policy has become like our parenting philosophy. Instead of “helicopter parenting” we engage in “helicopter colonialism.” We won’t admit it, but the U.S., especially those on the left, view everyone else in the world as over grown children who need our beneficence. A lot of what they say sounds like love, and I’m sure it feels like it too. Just like it feels like love when we help our children at times when we should let them fail because it makes us feel bad to watch them fail. We have ruined the character of many through “helicopter parenting.” Having raised a generation that will not grow up and move out of our basements, it is clear that the wisdom and moral clarity required to raise healthy children has largely departed. We no longer know love when we see it. Perhaps our sound-byte culture with its shallow platitudes and virtue signaling are insufficient to form parenting philosophies or immigration policies. Perhaps our children and the people of the world are not chess pieces to be moved around at the whim of our tender feelings. Perhaps there are things we cannot see, and unintended consequences we are not wise enough to foresee. Perhaps we should ask, “Why do people from ”under developed” countries come here?” I would suggest we follow that question up with, “What are our REAL motives for wanting them to come here?” “Helicopter colonialism”, I believe, can be as dangerous and debilitating to those we are trying to help as “helicopter parenting” has been to our own children. And we should take care to think soberly and judiciously about our immigration policy before we ruin the moral character of other noble people by transforming them into dependent victims in the same way that we have our own children.